Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Surgical Procedure- Mitral Valve Replacement Scenario: A patient was admitted into the hospital and is scheduled to have open-heart surgery within 8 hours of arrival. - Wridemy Essaydoers

Surgical Procedure- Mitral Valve Replacement   Scenario: A patient was admitted into the hospital and is scheduled to have open-heart surgery within 8 hours of arrival.

 Surgical Procedure- Mitral Valve Replacement  

Scenario: A patient was admitted into the hospital and is scheduled to have open-heart surgery within 8 hours of arrival. You are the Preop Nurse assigned to the patient. You are also assigned to two other patients that need to be in surgery by 7:30 am.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE RUBRIC BELOW EVERYTHING IS THERE FOR THIS SCENARIO!!

Introduction

HIPAA, Legal, and Regulatory Discussion

Scenario Ending and Recommendations

Scenario ending: A technology downtime that impacts patient care occurs, and an error is made.  Construct based on those reflections.

Advantages and Disadvantages

Conclusion and Reflections   

Purpose

The purpose of this assignment is to investigate informatics in healthcare and to apply professional, ethical, and legal principles to its appropriate use in healthcare technology.

Course outcomes: This assignment enables the student to meet the following course outcomes:

CO 4: Investigate safeguards and decision‐making support tools embedded in patient care technologies and information systems to support a safe practice environment for both patients and healthcare workers. (PO 4)

CO 6: Discuss the principles of data integrity, professional ethics, and legal requirements related to data security, regulatory requirements, confidentiality, and client’s right to privacy. (PO 6)

CO 8: Discuss the value of best evidence as a driving force to institute change in the delivery of nursing care. (PO 8)

Due date: Your faculty member will inform you when this assignment is due. The Late Assignment Policy applies to this assignment.

Total points possible: 240 points

Requirements:

· Research, compose, and type a scholarly paper based on the scenario provided by your faculty, and choose a conclusion scenario to discuss within the body of your paper. Reflect on lessons learned in this class about technology, privacy concerns, and legal and ethical issues and address each of these concepts in the paper. Consider the consequences of such a scenario. Do not limit your review of the literature to the nursing discipline only because other health professionals are using the technology, and you may need to apply critical thinking skills to its applications in this scenario.

· Use Microsoft Word and APA formatting. Consult your copy of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, as well as the resources in Doc Sharing if you have questions (e.g., margin size, font type and size (point), use of third person, etc.). Take advantage of the writing service SmartThinking, which is accessed by clicking on the link called the Tutor Source, found under the Course Home area.

· The length of the paper should be four to five pages, excluding the title page and the reference page. Limit the references to a few key sources (minimum of three required).

· The paper will contain an introduction that catches the attention of the reader, states the purpose of the paper, and provides a narrative outline of what will follow (i.e., the assignment criteria).

· In the body of the paper, discuss the scenario in relation to HIPAA, legal, and other regulatory requirements that apply to the scenario and the ending you chose. Demonstrate support from sources of evidence (references) included as in‐text citations.

· Choose and identify one of the possible endings provided for the scenario, and construct your paper based on its implications to the scenario. Make recommendations about what should have been done and what could be done to correct or mitigate the problems caused by the scenario and the ending you chose. Demonstrate support from

sources of evidence (references) included as in‐text citations.

· Present the advantages and disadvantages of informatics relating to your scenario and describe professional and ethical principles appropriate to your chosen ending. Use facts from supporting sources of evidence, which must be included as in‐text citations.

· The paper’s conclusion should summarize what you learned and make reflections about them to your practice.

· Use the “Directions and Assignment Criteria” and “Grading Rubric” below to guide your writing and ensure that all

components are complete.

· Review the section on Academic Honesty found in the Chamberlain Course Policies. All work must be original (in your own words). Papers will automatically be submitted to TurnItIn when submitted to the Dropbox.

NR360 Information Systems in Healthcare RUA: We Can, But Dare We? Guidelines

© 2022 Chamberlain University. All Rights Reserved.

NR360_RUA_We_Can_But_Dare_We_Guidelines_JULY22 1

· Submit the completed paper to the “We Can But Dare We?” Dropbox by the end of Week 3. Please refer to the Syllabus for due dates for this assignment. For online students, please post questions about this assignment to the weekly Q & A Forums so that the entire class may view the answers.

Preparing the assignment

Background

Healthcare is readily embracing any technology to improve patient outcomes, streamline operations, and lower costs, but we must also consider the impact of such technology on privacy and patient care.

Your faculty member will provide a scenario for you to address in your paper.

Choose an ending to the scenario, and construct your paper based on those reflections.

Choose one of the following outcomes:

1. A HIPAA violation occurs, and client data is exposed to the media.

2. A medication error has harmed a client.

3. A technology downtime that impacts patient care occurs, and an error is made.

4. A ransomware attack has occurred, and the organization must contemplate paying the ransom or lose access to patient data.

Follow these guidelines when completing this assignment. Speak with your faculty member if you have questions. Include the following sections:

a. Introduction – 40 points/17%

· Catches attention of the reader

· States purpose of the paper

· Provides a narrative outline of the paper (i.e., the assignment criteria)

b. HIPAA, Legal, and Regulatory Discussion – 40 points/17%

· Presents evidence from recent scholarly publications to address the impact of technology on nursing care related to:

· Patient privacy and HIPAA standards

· Healthcare regulations

· Legal guidelines on appropriate use of technology

c. Scenario Ending and Recommendations – 50 points/21%

· Selects and presents one scenario ending as the focus of the assignment.

· Evaluates the actions taken by healthcare providers as the situation evolved.

· Recommends actions that could have been taken to mitigate the circumstances presented in the selected scenario ending.

· Supports recommendations with evidence from recent scholarly publications.

d. Advantages and Disadvantages – 50 points/21%

· Presents evidence from recent scholarly publications to address the impact of technology on nursing care related to:

· The advantages of appropriately using technology in healthcare

· Risks of technology use in healthcare

· Describes professional and ethical principles guiding the appropriate use of technology in healthcare.

e. Conclusion and Reflections – 30 points/12%

· Summarizes what new information was learned by completing this assignment.

· Reflects on how this new knowledge will impact future behavior as a healthcare professional.

f. Scholarly Writing and APA Format – 30 points/12%

· Paper submitted as a Microsoft Word document.

· Adheres to current APA formatting guidelines including proper use of:

· Title page

· Page numbers

· Length is 4-5 pages, excluding title and reference pages.

· Includes at least three (3) references that are:

· From recent (within the last 5 years) scholarly sources

· Cited in text appropriately

· Included on an APA formatted reference page

· Scholarly writing reflects:

· Accurate spelling

· Correct use of professional grammar

· Logical organization of thoughts (mechanics)

For writing assistance, visit the Writing Center.

Please note that your instructor may provide you with additional assessments in any form to determine that you fully understand the concepts learned in the review module.

( NR360 Information Systems in Healthcare RUA: We Can, But Dare We? Guidelines )

© 2022 Chamberlain University. All Rights Reserved.

NR360_RUA_We_Can_But_Dare_We_Guidelines- JULY22 1

Grading Rubric Criteria are met when the student’s application of knowledge demonstrates achievement of the outcomes for this assignment.

Assignment Section and Required Criteria

(Points possible/% of total points available)

Highest Level of Performance

High Level of Performance

Satisfactory Level of Performance

Unsatisfactory Level of Performance

Section not present in paper

Introduction

(40 points/17%)

40 points

36 points

32 points

15 points

0 points

Required criteria

· Catches attention of the reader.

· States purpose of the paper.

· Provides a narrative outline of the paper (i.e., the assignment criteria).

Meets all requirements for section.

Includes no fewer than 2 requirements for section.

Includes no less than 1 requirement for section.

Present, yet includes no required criteria.

No requirements for this section presented.

HIPAA, Legal, and Regulatory Discussion

(40 points/17%)

40 points

36 points

32 points

15 points

0 points

Required criteria

Presents evidence from recent scholarly publications to address the impact of technology on nursing care related to:

· Patient privacy and HIPAA standards

· Healthcare regulations

· Legal guidelines on appropriate use of technology

Meets all requirements for section.

Includes no fewer than 2 requirements for section.

Includes no fewer than 1 requirement for section.

Present, yet includes no required criteria.

No requirements for this section presented.

Scenario Ending and Recommendations

(50 points/21%)

50 points

46 points

42 points

19 points

0 points

Required criteria

· Selects and presents one scenario ending as the focus of the assignment.

· Evaluates the actions taken by healthcare providers as the situation evolved.

· Recommends actions that could have been taken to mitigate the circumstances presented in the selected scenario ending. Supports recommendations with evidence from

· recent scholarly publications.

Meets all requirements for section.

Includes no fewer than 3 requirements for section.

Includes 1-2 requirements for section.

Section present yet includes no required criteria.

No requirements for this section presented.

( NR360 Information Systems in Healthcare RUA: We Can, But Dare We? Guidelines )

© 2022 Chamberlain University. All Rights Reserved.

NR360_RUA_We_Can_But_Dare_We_Guidelines- JULY22 1

Assignment Section and Required Criteria

(Points possible/% of total points available)

Highest Level of Performance

High Level of Performance

Satisfactory Level of Performance

Unsatisfactory Level of Performance

Section not present in paper

· Supports recommendations with evidence from

recent scholarly publications.

Advantages and Disadvantages

(50 points/21%)

50 points

46 points

42 points

19 points

0 points

Required criteria

· Presents evidence from recent scholarly publications to address the impact of technology on nursing care.

· Evidence includes the advantages of appropriately using technology in healthcare.

· Evidence includes risks of inappropriately using technology in healthcare.

· Describes professional and ethical principles guiding the appropriate use of technology in healthcare.

Meets all requirements for section.

Includes no fewer than 3 requirements for section.

Includes 1-2 requirements for section.

Section present yet includes no required criteria

No requirements for this section presented.

Conclusion and Reflections

(30 points/12%)

30 points

15 points

0 points

Required criteria

· Summarizes new information learned by completing this assignment.

· Reflects on how this new knowledge will impact future behavior as a healthcare professional.

Meets all requirements for section.

Includes 1 requirement for section.

No requirements for this section presented.

Scholarly Writing and APA Format

(30 points/12%)

30 points

26 points

22 points

12 points

0 points

Required criteria

· Paper submitted as a Microsoft Word document.

· Adheres to current APA formatting guidelines including proper use of:

Meets all requirements for section.

Includes no fewer than 4 fully met requirements for section.

Includes no fewer than 3 fully met requirements for section.

Includes 1-2 requirements fully met requirements for section.

No requirements for this section presented.

Assignment Section and Required Criteria

(Points possible/% of total points available)

Highest Level of Performance

High Level of Performance

Satisfactory Level of Performance

Unsatisfactory Level of Performance

Section not present in paper

· Title page

· Page numbers

· Length is 4-5 pages, excluding title and reference pages.

· Includes at least three (3) references that are:

· From recent (within the last 5 years) scholarly sources

· Cited in text appropriately

· Included on an APA formatted reference page

· Scholarly writing reflects:

· Accurate spelling

· Correct use of professional grammar

· Logical organization of thoughts (mechanics)

Total Points Possible = 240 points

,

NURSING INFORMATICS and the Foundation of Knowledge FOURTH EDITION

Dee McGonigle, PhD, RN, CNE, FAAN, ANEF Director, Virtual Learning Experiences (VLE) and Professor Graduate Program, Chamberlain College of Nursing Member, Informatics and Technology Expert Panel (ITEP) for the American Academy of Nursing

Kathleen Mastrian, PhD, RN Associate Professor and Program Coordinator for Nursing Pennsylvania State University, Shenango Sr. Managing Editor, Online Journal of Nursing Informatics (OJNI)

JONES & BARTLETT LEARNING

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VP, Executive Publisher: David D. Cella Executive Editor: Amanda Martin Editorial Assistant: Christina Freitas Production Manager: Carolyn Rogers Pershouse Senior Marketing Manager: Jennifer Scherzay Product Fulfillment Manager: Wendy Kilborn Composition: S4Carlisle Publishing Services Cover and Text Design: Michael O’Donnell Rights & Media Specialist: Wes DeShano Media Development Editor: Shannon Sheehan Cover Image (Title Page, Part Opener, Chapter Opener): © fotomak/Shutterstock Printing and Binding: LSC Communications Cover Printing: LSC Communications

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Names: McGonigle, Dee, editor. | Mastrian, Kathleen Garver, editor. Title: Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge/[edited by] Dee McGonigle, Kathleen Mastrian. Description: Fourth edition. | Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, [2018] | Includes bibliographical references and index. Identifiers: LCCN 2016043838 | ISBN 9781284121247 (pbk.) Subjects: | MESH: Nursing Informatics | Knowledge Classification: LCC RT50.5 | NLM WY 26.5 | DDC 651.5/04261–dc23

LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2016043838

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The Pedagogy Nursing Informatics and the Foundation of Knowledge, Fourth Edition drives comprehension through a variety of strategies geared toward meeting the learning needs of students, while also generating enthusiasm about the topic. This interactive approach addresses diverse learning styles, making this the ideal text to ensure mastery of key concepts. The pedagogical aids that appear in most chapters include the following:

Special Acknowledgments We want to express our sincere appreciation to the staff at Jones & Bartlett Learning, especially Amanda, Christina, and Carolyn, for their continued encouragement, assistance, and support during the writing process and publication of our book.

Contents Preface Acknowledgments Contributors

SECTION I: BUILDING BLOCKS OF NURSING INFORMATICS

1 Nursing Science and the Foundation of Knowledge Dee McGonigle and Kathleen Mastrian Introduction Quality and Safety Education for Nurses Summary References

2 Introduction to Information, Information Science, and Information Systems Kathleen Mastrian and Dee McGonigle Introduction Information Information Science Information Processing Information Science and the Foundation of Knowledge Introduction to Information Systems

Summary References

3 Computer Science and the Foundation of Knowledge Model Dee McGonigle, Kathleen Mastrian, and June Kaminski Introduction The Computer as a Tool for Managing Information and Generating Knowledge Components What Is the Relationship of Computer Science to Knowledge? How Does the Computer Support Collaboration and Information Exchange? Cloud Computing Looking to the Future Summary Working Wisdom Application Scenario References

4 Introduction to Cognitive Science and Cognitive Informatics Kathleen Mastrian and Dee McGonigle Introduction Cognitive Science Sources of Knowledge Nature of Knowledge

How Knowledge and Wisdom Are Used in Decision Making Cognitive Informatics Cognitive Informatics and Nursing Practice What Is AI? Summary References

5 Ethical Applications of Informatics Dee McGonigle, Kathleen Mastrian, and Nedra Farcus Introduction Ethics Bioethics Ethical Issues and Social Media Ethical Dilemmas and Morals Ethical Decision Making Theoretical Approaches to Healthcare Ethics Applying Ethics to Informatics Case Analysis Demonstration New Frontiers in Ethical Issues Summary References

SECTION II: PERSPECTIVES ON NURSING INFORMATICS

6 History and Evolution of Nursing Informatics

Kathleen Mastrian and Dee McGonigle Introduction The Evolution of a Specialty What Is Nursing Informatics? The DIKW Paradigm Capturing and Codifying the Work of Nursing The Nurse as a Knowledge Worker The Future Summary References

7 Nursing Informatics as a Specialty Dee McGonigle, Kathleen Mastrian, Julie A. Kenney, and Ida Androwich Introduction Nursing Contributions to Healthcare Informatics Scope and Standards Nursing Informatics Roles Specialty Education and Certification Nursing Informatics Competencies Rewards of NI Practice NI Organizations and Journals The Future of Nursing Informatics Summary References

8 Legislative Aspects of Nursing Informatics: HITECH and HIPAA

Kathleen M. Gialanella, Kathleen Mastrian, and Dee McGonigle Introduction HIPAA Came First Overview of the HITECH Act How a National HIT Infrastructure Is Being Developed How the HITECH Act Changed HIPAA Implications for Nursing Practice Future Regulations Summary References

SECTION III: NURSING INFORMATICS ADMINISTRATIVE APPLICATIONS: PRECARE AND CARE SUPPORT

9 Systems Development Life Cycle: Nursing Informatics and Organizational Decision Making Dee McGonigle and Kathleen Mastrian Introduction Waterfall Model Rapid Prototyping or Rapid Application Development Object-Oriented Systems Development Dynamic System Development Method Computer-Aided Software Engineering Tools

Open Source Software and Free/Open Source Software Interoperability Summary References

10 Administrative Information Systems Marianela Zytkowski, Susan Paschke, Kathleen Mastrian, and Dee McGonigle Introduction Types of Healthcare Organization Information Systems Communication Systems Core Business Systems Order Entry Systems Patient Care Support Systems Interoperability Aggregating Patient and Organizational Data Department Collaboration and Exchange of Knowledge and Information Summary References

11 The Human–Technology Interface Dee McGonigle, Kathleen Mastrian, and Judith A. Effken Introduction The Human–Technology Interface The Human–Technology Interface Problem Improving the Human–Technology Interface

A Framework for Evaluation Future of the Human–Technology Interface Summary References

12 Electronic Security Lisa Reeves Bertin, Kathleen Mastrian, and Dee McGonigle Introduction Securing Network Information Authentication of Users Threats to Security Security Tools Offsite Use of Portable Devices Summary References

13 Workflow and Beyond Meaningful Use Dee McGonigle, Kathleen Mastrian, and Denise Hammel-Jones Introduction Workflow Analysis Purpose Workflow and Technology Workflow Analysis and Informatics Practice Informatics as a Change Agent Measuring the Results Future Directions Summary References

SECTION IV: NURSING INFORMATICS PRACTICE APPLICATIONS: CARE DELIVERY

14 The Electronic Health Record and Clinical Informatics Emily B. Barey, Kathleen Mastrian, and Dee McGonigle Introduction Setting the Stage Components of Electronic Health Records Advantages of Electronic Health Records Standardized Terminology and the EHR Ownership of Electronic Health Records Flexibility and Expandability Accountable Care Organizations and the EHR The Future Summary References

15 Informatics Tools to Promote Patient Safety and Quality Outcomes Dee McGonigle and Kathleen Mastrian Introduction What Is a Culture of Safety? Strategies for Developing a Safety Culture Informatics Technologies for Patient Safety Role of the Nurse Informaticist

Summary References

16 Patient Engagement and Connected Health Kathleen Mastrian and Dee McGonigle Introduction Consumer Demand for Information Health Literacy and Health Initiatives Healthcare Organization Approaches to Engagement Promoting Health Literacy in School-Aged Children Supporting Use of the Internet for Health Education Future Directions for Engaging Patients Summary References

17 Using Informatics to Promote Community/Population Health Dee McGonigle, Kathleen Mastrian, Margaret Ross Kraft, and Ida Androwich Introduction Core Public Health Functions Community Health Risk Assessment: Tools for Acquiring Knowledge Processing Knowledge and Information to Support Epidemiology and Monitoring Disease

Outbreaks Applying Knowledge to Health Disaster Planning and Preparation Informatics Tools to Support Communication and Dissemination Using Feedback to Improve Responses and Promote Readiness Summary References

18 Telenursing and Remote Access Telehealth Original contribution by Audrey Kinsella, Kathleen Albright, Sheldon Prial, and Schuyler F. Hoss; revised by Kathleen Mastrian and Dee McGonigle Introduction The Foundation of Knowledge Model and Home Telehealth Nursing Aspects of Telehealth History of Telehealth Driving Forces for Telehealth Telehealth Care Telenursing Telehealth Patient Populations Tools of Home Telehealth Home Telehealth Software Home Telehealth Practice and Protocols Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues

The Patient’s Role in Telehealth Telehealth Research Evolving Telehealth Models Parting Thoughts for the Future and a View Toward What the Future Holds Summary References

SECTION V: EDUCATION APPLICATIONS OF NURSING INFORMATICS

19 Nursing Informatics and Nursing Education Heather E. McKinney, Sylvia DeSantis, Kathleen Mastrian, and Dee McGonigle Introduction: Nursing Education and the Foundation of Knowledge Model Knowledge Acquisition and Sharing Evolution of Learning Management Systems Delivery Modalities Technology Tools Supporting Education Internet-Based Tools Promoting Active and Collaborative Learning Knowledge Dissemination and Sharing Exploring Information Fair Use and Copyright Restrictions The Future Summary References

20 Simulation, Game Mechanics, and Virtual Worlds in Nursing Education Dee McGonigle, Kathleen Mastrian, Brett Bixler, and Nickolaus Miehl Introduction Simulation in Nursing Informatics Education Nursing Informatics Competencies in Nursing Education A Case for Simulation in Nursing Informatics Education and Nursing Education Incorporating EHRs into the Learning Environment Challenges and Opportunities The Future of Simulation in Nursing Informatics Education Game Mechanics an

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